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Authors for Indies Day (Saturday, April 29, 2017) is a day when authors show their appreciation for Canadian independent bookstores (indies). Authors do this by volunteering as guest booksellers for the day. When you visit an indie bookstore on AFI Day, you'll have the opportunity to meet local authors, chat with 'em booklover to booklover, and get personal book recommendations! You may buy a book or two, or just get to know your local bookstore better. 

Authors are doing this to raise awareness of indie bookstores and how important they are to our communities, our reading lives, and our cultural well-being. It's a day to give some love to your local neighbourhood bookstore.  
So save the date on your calendar. Tell your friends, family, and colleagues about Authors for Indies Day on April 29. Stay in the loop with updates by following Authors for Indies on FacebookTwitter and using the hashtag, #AFI2017   

Kent Bookstore  is happy to be hosting the following authors: 

Heather Tucker  10-1pm  * Sara C. Walker     * Terri Lamarche 1-3pm   *  Sarah Beardy 1-3pm    *  Deborah Ironstand  1-3pm   *  Pegi Eyers  2:30-4:30   *  Meaghan McIsaac 12:30-   *  Linda Oliver 12-   * Stefan Ellery  * Vivienne Barker 10-12pm  * Tiffany Short 3-5pm

 
 Coffee and treats/  free books/  great conversations / grand prize  Draw for a gift basket of books and treats

Heather Tucker has won many prose and short-story writing competitions, and her stories have appeared in anthologies and literary journals. She lives in Ajax, Ontario.

A stunning and lyrical debut novel 

A 2016 Indie Next and Indies Introduce Pick! 

Vincent Appleton smiles at his daughters, raises a gun, and blows off his head. For the Appleton sisters, life had unravelled many times before. This time it explodes. 

Eight-year-old Hariet, known to all as Ari, is dispatched to Cape Breton and her Aunt Mary, who is purported to eat little girls. But Mary and her partner, Nia, offer an unexpected refuge to Ari and her steadfast companion, Jasper, an imaginary seahorse. 

Yet the respite does not last, and Ari is torn from her aunts and forced back to her twisted mother and fractured sisters. Her new stepfather, Len, and his family offer hope, but as Ari grows to adore them, she’s severed violently from them too, when her mother moves in with the brutal Dick Irwin. 

Through the sexual revolution and drug culture of the 1960s, Ari struggles with her father’s legacy and her mother’s addictions, testing limits with substances that numb and men who show her kindness. Ari spins through a chaotic decade of loss and love, the devilish and divine, with wit, tenacity, and the astonishing balance unique to seahorses. 

The Clay Girl is a beautiful tour de force about a child sculpted by kindness, cruelty, and the extraordinary power of imagination, and her families — the one she’s born in to and the one she creates.

Sara C. Walker is an author, editor, and poet. She is the author of urban fantasy for teens, and action romance for new adults. Her speculative short fiction and poetry has been published at CommuterLit and in the anthologies Twist of Fate, On the Brink, and GalleyCat's Varney the Vampire: a literary remix.

She is the editor of Kawartha Lakes Stories, an anthology of genre stories set in the City of Kawartha Lakes as told by local writers, and previously was the editor of the now-defunct book blog, Urban Fantasy Land, which was quoted in author's books, and by Publisher's Weekly, American Library Journal and Wikipedia.



When Melantha Caldwell turns sixteen on Valentine's Day she will come into her spell-turner powers. It should be the happy event she'd looked forward to her whole life, but at the moment she could care less. A sorcerer has killed her mother and magic doesn't seem to be working for her anyway, so Mel would rather have nothing to do with magic ever again. She just wants to be a normal fifteen year old, living a normal life in Ottawa, doing normal things like going to high school, and having a boyfriend. But a social life is not something Mel’s Gran will let her have. 

So when an elf from the Magic Council arrives to ask Mel to help him catch her mother's killer, Mel tells him she's not interested. But in the asking, the elf reveals that Mel attends the same school as the son of the killer. This has her intrigued because the boy happens to be the wimpiest kid in school. When the elf offers to take away Mel's overbearing Gran so she can get the job done, Mel agrees. It's finally her chance to live a normal life, and all she has to do is get inside the sorcerer's home. If only it were that simple . . . 

The elf leaves Mel with a guardian-- the most annoying creature on the planet: a talking cricket. The boy Mel hopes to make her boyfriend suddenly takes on a super jealous streak. And if she doesn't get the job done, a curse will be upon her. Literally. What's more if Mel doesn't catch the sorcerer, he will succeed in his plan to remove magic from all spell-turners, and as much as she hates magic, Mel knows she can't let the sorcerer succeed or she'll lose everyone she cares about. 

Terri Lamarche is a First Nations Cree elder of the Attawapiskat First Nation. Terri’s early years were spent living with her maternal grandmother near James Bay, and since her teen years she has mostly lived in and near Toronto, Ontario. Terri came to faith as a young mother raising her three children alone in Toronto. Terri is a member of Rehoboth Ministries in Brampton and she has run Bread of Life ministries through which she has fed and cared for the underprivileged in Toronto for many years. She now resides at Wigwamen Terrace, an apartment complex for Aboriginal seniors.

First Nations Christian Writers volume 2 is a newly released anthology published by independent, Manitoba-based Goldrock Press. It features a variety of writing styles and genres written by First Nations Christian writers from all across Canada.

There are fifteen contributors in total. University student, Naomi Peters, writes with great depth and insight a poem about residential school while high school teacher, Grace Ross, shares her experiences of spousal abuse, and Doctor Thomas McDonald, ThD, discuss issues surrounding Indigenous peoples and Christianity. The collection also includes stories about life in the foster care system written by a 14-year-old boy in foster care, the challenges of helping family members, overcoming addictions, and dealing with illness and aging

Deborah Ironstand   grew up in Grandview, in the Valley River Indian Reserve, and in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She now resides in Guelph, Ontario. Deborah’s writing has been previously published in Northern Writers volume 5 and First Nations Christian Writers volume 1. She was recently a guest on 100 Huntley St., and we are expecting a telecast of that pre-recorded interview sometime in late March or early April.
 

First Nations Christian Writers volume 2   is a newly released anthology published by independent, Manitoba-based Goldrock Press. It features a variety of writing styles and genres written by First Nations Christian writers from all across Canada.


There are fifteen contributors in total. University student, Naomi Peters, writes with great depth and insight a poem about residential school while high school teacher, Grace Ross, shares her experiences of spousal abuse, and Doctor Thomas McDonald, ThD, discuss issues surrounding Indigenous peoples and Christianity. The collection also includes stories about life in the foster care system written by a 14-year-old boy in foster care, the challenges of helping family members, overcoming addictions, and dealing with illness and aging.
 

Sarah Beardy   is a member of the Muskrat Dam Lake band. Her father is Oji-Cree, originally from Bearskin Lake, and her mother is of European descent from Newfoundland. Sarah has five children. She has an honors BA degree majoring in Psychology and Indigenous Studies, and is looking into a future Masters study.
 

First Nations Christian Writers volume 2   is a newly released anthology published by independent, Manitoba-based Goldrock Press. It features a variety of writing styles and genres written by First Nations Christian writers from all across Canada.


There are fifteen contributors in total. University student, Naomi Peters, writes with great depth and insight a poem about residential school while high school teacher, Grace Ross, shares her experiences of spousal abuse, and Doctor Thomas McDonald, ThD, discuss issues surrounding Indigenous peoples and Christianity. The collection also includes stories about life in the foster care system written by a 14-year-old 

Pegi Eyers has released her first book Ancient Spirit Rising: Reclaiming Your Roots & Restoring Earth Community that focuses on the vital recovery of our own ancestral earth-connected knowledge and essential eco-selves.  She also works with social justice, and modalities for acquiring better intercultural competency skills with First Nations on the winding path to reconciliation and healing. Pegi self-identifies as a Celtic Animist, is a devotee of nature-based culture, and lives in the countryside on the outskirts of Peterborough, Ontario, Canada on a hilltop with views reaching for miles in all directions. www.stonecirclepress.com

Meaghan McIsaac is an author of books for children and young adults. She briefly lived in the UK, where she completed her MA in Writing for Children, and now lives in Whitby, Ontario and is a full-time writer. When she isn’t writing she is busy taking care of one noisy beagle and one hungry lab. Her books for young readers include Urgle, Underhand and the sci fi series Movers.

Ever since I was a very young child I have been intrigued by little books. At home on the farm, money was not plentiful, so a new book had special magical powers, transporting me on exciting journeys and stimulating my already active imagination. This early fascination with words and pictures has stayed with me throughout my life, spurring on a natural inclination to dream.

When my work finally lead me to education, my belief of “if you can read, you can do anything” was the message I tried to instill in my students. After retiring, I was in need a hobby and I decided to write children’s books for my own enjoyment.  After meeting with the wonderful people at Cavern of Dreams Publishing I knew it was an excellent fit to help provide a broader audience for my books.

Recognizing that children need to have fun, my stories are written in rhyming text to encourage young readers. My dream is that they will be entertained, and hopefully incite their imaginations and help create a “love of language” that will remain with them forever!

Linda Oliver currently resides in Lindsey, ON.


 

Stefan Ellery is a multi genre author who writes Horror, YA Paranormal and Children stories. He has short fiction published in four different anthologies including the previous Kawartha Lakes Stories Anthology. He has three self published children stories and novel series called circle of roses with two published novels.  A Burden of Choice and a Burden of Death. Stefan is currently finishing the third novel in the series.


Vivienne Barker, born and raised in England, art college dropout, fish and chip fryer, civil servant, library technician and much more…obviously attention deficient; now retired to the beautiful Kawartha Lakes area of Ontario, Canada. Having worked for “the man” all her adult life, decided to finally do what she wanted, which was to look after animals. Her company Four on the Floor (and a Tail) was a passion for five years prior to retirement.

At a party, she was asked to speak about family origins and any interesting events therein. Friends were intrigued, and said she should write a book. So she did. “The Train Now Leaving…” started mainly to save her sanity while confined to home for three months due to family illness, launched May 13, 2017. Her short story “The Shaman’s Prophecy is included in the Kawartha Lakes Writers Summer Anthology, and Footprints in the Snow has been accepted for the Winter Anthology 2017-2018. She also has a story “The Verdict is In” included in “Shorelines” published by Polar Expressions.

When not scribbling, she can be found walking her dog Cassie along the lake shore, creating an English garden (how foolish in a northern Ontario climate!) volunteering at the local horticultural society, and sitting on her deck enjoying the view (and the odd gin and tonic!)


 

Tiffany Short is an emerging writer who has previously been published in Kawartha Lakes Stories with her story “Rough Justice”. She has recently completed a ten-month mentorship with Sylvia McNicoll (Canadian Author) via the CSARN mentorship program.